2017 · CGH · Podcast · Study

GI Pearls Episode 5 – Last two weeks of June 2017

Show Notes for 2017 Second two weeks of June 005
  1. Cost Utility Analysis of Topical Steroids Compared With Dietary Elimination for Treatment of Eosinophilic Esophagitis – CGH
  2. Incidence and Prevalence of Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis in Olmsted County, Minnesota From 1970 Through 2010 – CGH
  3. Fecal Immunochemical Test Detects Sessile Serrated Adenomas and Polyps With a Low Level of Sensitivity – CGH
  4. Comparison of Two Intensive Bowel Cleansing Regimens in Patients With Previous Poor Bowel Preparation: A Randomized Controlled Study. – GIE
  5. Acute Fatty Liver Disease of Pregnancy: Updates in Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Management – ACG
  6. Disentangling the Association between Statins, Cholesterol, and Colorectal Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study – PLOS Medicine
  7. Association of Gastric Acid Suppression With Recurrent Clostridium difficile InfectionA Systematic Review and Meta-analysis – JAMA Internal Med
  8. Amanita phalloides Mushroom Poisonings — Northern California, December 2016 – MMWR June 2017
  9. Wild Mushrooms: An Exclusive Delicacy or Last Meal – ACG
  10. Treatment of NASH: What Helps Beyond Weight Loss? – ACG
  11. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Celiac disease: A systematic review with pooled-data analysis – Neurogastro & Motility
2017 · CGH · Podcast

GI Pearls Episode 2 – First two weeks of May 2017

Show Notes for 2017 May 1- 15 002

 This one is a bit noisy. Not the Best Microphone. Sorry. 

List of articles cited

  1. Tofacitinib as Induction and Maintenance Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis NEJM
  2. Thiazolidinediones and Advanced Liver Fibrosis in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis  – Jama Internal Medicine
  3. Tenapanor Treatment of Patients With Constipation-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Phase 2, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Efficacy and Safety Trial  The AmJ of Gastro
Article · CGH · Uncategorized

HCC in the absence of Cirrhosis

We often talk to
Hepatocellular_carcinoma_1.jpgour patients with cirrhosis regarding the risk of HCC, and putting aside the debate as to the efficacy of screening for such, most of our patients get the ultrasound twice yearly, +/- AFP every so often, and we cross our fingers and hope for the best, given how non-existent effective therapy for HCC is (other than resection).

This article in CGH – which regained the title of my second most favorite GI journal this week, is an article from the Texan folks, discussing HCC in the absence of cirrhosis.

This is a review of the Veteran’s Affairs database (boy would I love to get my hands on that!), 2005-2011 diagnoses of HCC, which was limited to 1500 random charts (obtained from a total of 10,695 HCC diagnoses).

~80% of the patients diagnosed with HCC had cirrhosis. Which means ~20% did not. Who are these remaining folks?

Many had metabolic syndrome, NAFLD, but some had no risk factors whatsoever.  It is interesting that in the cohort of 43 patients with what authors defined as “No cirrhosis – very high probability” – many still had some fibrosis.

In any case, logistic regression to look for associations and risk factors for HCC in absence of cirrhosis was conducted. Results:

NAFLD, HCV, HBV, Alcohol abuse, Metabolic syndrome, Others (hemochromatosis, autoimmune hepatitis, A1-AT deficiency). Idiopathic – only in 13 out of 194 patients!

Conclusions: 

  1. Glad to know that we are aware of major risk factors for HCC even in the absence of cirrhosis.
  2. No evidence as of yet to expand the risk pool to screen patients without evidence of cirrhosis.
  3. If chemoprevention is ever developed, now we know a good population to apply it in ( ex – Maybe Metformin?.
  4. It would be nice to have a large data dump of such patients on a national level, and include other variables in analysis, such as factors associated with good outcome or poor outcome. I suppose we can wait for the next paper.